Rohingya refugees have fled violence and persecution in Myanmar in search of safety in neighbouring Bangladesh

Rohingya Crisis Update: 620,000 refugees in 100 days

Rohingya refugees have fled violence and persecution in Myanmar in search of safety in neighbouring Bangladesh

By Action Against Hunger News

Dec 6 2017

Since August 25, in just three months, more than 620,000 Rohingya refugees have fled violence and persecution in Myanmar in search of safety in neighbouring Bangladesh. 

Six out of ten of these refugees are children. They live in camps in Bangladesh’s southernmost district, Cox's Bazar, and most of them have only survived because of the services of humanitarian organisations authorised to operate in the region. The pace and scale of this movement have prompted the United Nations to call this the “world’s fastest growing refugee crisis” that shows little signs of abating. In a two-day period last week, 2,800 people crossed the border into Bangladesh.

Most refugees fled with only the clothes they were wearing. Thousands suffer from hunger, and many children have not been vaccinated for measles or cholera. They are now dependent on humanitarian aid to meet their basic needs. The living conditions in the camps in the Cox's Bazar region of Bangladesh, where most of the refugees have arrived, are particularly difficult. Overcrowding, poor sanitation, lack of access to safe water, and heavy rains have escalated risks of outbreaks of waterborne diseases. 

CHILDREN IN JEOPARDY

Action Against Hunger’s assessment in refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar found that 7.5% of children are suffering from life-threatening severe acute malnutrition. An estimated 40,000 of those children are at risk of death. 

Most of the Rohingya refugees are children: they comprise between 55% and 58% of the total refugee population. Children in the camps face a high risk of abuse, neglect, exploitation, trafficking, and discrimination, as well as major threats to their health. 

The conditions for children and adolescents are deplorable. Many refugees have no choice but to create makeshift shelters on the roads or sleep outside in the open air, near camps, roads, and forests. The massive influx of refugees in just 100 days has been overwhelming to the humanitarian community in Cox’s Bazar. People are extremely vulnerable, traumatised, and in urgent need of immediate assistance to meet their daily survival needs for food, water, shelter, sanitation, and emergency health care. 

Our Team in Action 

See our team in action in Katupalong in a EuroNews feature published on 23rd November 2017.

 

 

Support our work in Bangladesh to provide urgent food and water and emergency services to Rahingya refugees from Myanmar
Support our work in Bangladesh to provide urgent food and water and emergency services to Rahingya refugees from Myanmar

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Images: Guillaume Binet for Action Against Hunger

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